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Who, What, Where, & Why~ {W Questions}
01-06-2012, 08:10 PM
Post: #2
RE: Who, What, Where, & Why~ {W Questions}
LOL. To answer that question fully I'd have to write an essay. But the short of the long of it is the following (note format):
1) Earth created. Woman = helpmate.
2) Patriarchal rulership. Women not equal but able to own property and have certain rights. (See Proverbs 31. Jewish women were strangely liberated in early times.)
3) European Feudalism - women in positions of authority (Queen Elizabeth, Victoria), though men still more powerful.
4) Feudalism overthrown in France, then Britain. America discovered.
5) 1st Congress of Patriarchs: white men, property owners. All white men who own property are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights.
6) Women, Afro-Americans, etc cannot vote, own property, etc.
7) Bible misappropriated; helpmate misconstrued to support commodification of women. Women become property that is handed down from father to husband. "Old maid" syndrome: old, unmarried daughters still living with father (protector).
8) Bourgeoisie women trained to be beautiful with manners, ie "charm school" to secure a good husband; proletariat women taught skill, ie cooking, cleaning, sewing etc.
9) Mary Shelley writes "A Vindication of the Rights of Woman." Women begin questioning their place in society.
10) Early feminism begins; the "new woman" of 19th century literature; liberated women are portrayed as evil, powerful, unnatural beings (read Haggard's "She". In Dracula, Stoker writes Lucy as a "new woman". Lucy is educated, intelligent and actively helps the men defeat Dracula, unlike the movie where she is portrayed as weak and passive). Domesticated, docile femininity is encouraged. Surge in women as authors and readers as women. Women begin to teach, become admin assistants, etc.
11) 1st wave feminism hits. Simone de Beauvoir writes "The Second Sex" <3, a great book that explains the dynamics in relationships and in the home that lead to women being "owned". Basically Beauvoir says "a woman is not born, but made. To be equal with a man, a woman must become a man." Ex: Hillary Clinton.
12) Second wave feminism. Radical 60 hippies chicks who have sex with everybody. Totally can't relate to this wave.
13) Third wave feminism, current: Judith Butler (brilliant lady!). Eve Sedgewick. Gender is socially constructed. Women can be "men" and men can be "women". Use of psychologist Lacan's "idealized notions of gender". To be a man means to be aggressive, logical, strong, certain, etc. To be a woman means to be passive, emotional (no logic), weak, uncertain. Men who have feminine qualities are considered effete and gay; women who have masculine qualities are considered bitches and lesbians.
Society continues its brainwashing of teenage girls with idealized views of married life, the prince on the white horse. Media outlets concentrate on beauty as the primary goal for all women, leading to eating disorders, cosmetic surgery. This aggressive emphasis demonstrates the hidden fear some men have that women might actually choose to focus on their intelligence, their athletic ability, or some other special talent, thereby throwing off the shackles of their oppression and becoming world leaders.

To this end, Stephanie Meyers, the anti-feminist, writes Twilight. Edward and Bella are pushed onto teenagers as the IDEAL romance; the weak, helpless female and her big, powerful, male vampire savior.

Everywhere, feminists rally together to oppose this anti-Christ of female equality.

Finally, I have a saying: "The enemy of woman is not man, it is woman herself. It is the woman who focuses only on beauty, love, marriage to the exclusion of education, athletics, etc that is woman's natural born enemy. It is the trophy woman, the gold-digging woman, the woman who uses her appearance to acquire money. It is lazy woman in her purest form, desiring nothing but to be taken care of by a man. This is woman's enemy."

Literature adds to reality, it does not simply describe it. It enriches the necessary competencies that daily life requires and provides; and in this respect, it irrigates the deserts that our lives have already become. CS Lewis.
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RE: Who, What, Where, & Why~ {W Questions} - Fruitfly - 01-06-2012 08:10 PM

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