ZAC EFRON | ZEFRON.COM - The Zac Efron Fan Forum
Music and Counterculture - Printable Version

+- ZAC EFRON | ZEFRON.COM - The Zac Efron Fan Forum (http://www.zefron.com/forum)
+-- Forum: Entertainment (/forumdisplay.php?fid=3)
+--- Forum: Music (/forumdisplay.php?fid=12)
+--- Thread: Music and Counterculture (/showthread.php?tid=1209)



Music and Counterculture - Fruitfly - 06-23-2012 06:54 AM

This morning I came across a reference to "scene kids" and had to look up a definition/description to understand what this alleged counterculture was about. It seems the movement revolves around big, outlandish colored hair, extensive accessories, imitation bisexuality/homosexuality and pure "self-confidence." The key here is that one is a scene kid through the construction of appearance, often mined from former sub-cultures, and through a self-confidence that does not allow for introspection and self-critique. Everyone who fails to appreciate the scene kid is a "hater" who should be ignored.

In these ways the "scene" is more ridiculous than it's counterpart, Emo, and the subcultures that came before it, because it involves the fetishization of objects and appearance and a similacrum pulled from previous cultures without an adhering philosophy or set of principles to ground it. Furthermore, unlike Emo that inscribes introspection, it does not allow for the possibility of critique of either the self or society, making it ineffectual as a potential locus of change. As a result, "Scene" is the appearance of Capitalism in a countercultural form, one that differs only through a transgression of social normativity, albeit in a non-meaningful way.

Both the hippie movement and the gothic movement were responses to and a critique of the political and social conditions of their time. The hippie movement grounded in such bands as The Beatles was political response to the Vietnam war and mysogyny; the idea of an all-inclusive love was the solution to governmental and cultural manifestations of hate and oppression. In the same way, 80's goth was a reaction to the end of the cold-war and to the advent of AIDS, with fear being a founding principle. The question of national meaning and individual meaning was reflected in literary and existential thought, and goths took up Sartre, Camus and Salinger and bands like The Cure. The result was a period of artistic flourish, as art was the only thing that could resonate and articulate the mindset where government and science failed.

TBC - gotta work. (-;


RE: Music and Counterculture - mirandagirl - 06-25-2012 08:25 PM

My brother and his friends are probably considered scene kids.